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Note the use of the word “violent,” says Michelle Ybarra, president of the Center for Innovative Public Health Research.

“Not all pornography is the same,” she told in May.

“That was really important.” Josephine, whose daughter is now 17 and doesn’t watch porn as much as she used to (“It seems so fake,” she says), doesn’t often discuss her experience with other parents.

Also often reported are concerns about girls growing up in a hypersexualized world as influenced by hardcore porn. That means early prevention (Langford recommends conversations about porn start as early as 7, if not earlier). “[My daughter] could not have a parent who could be more comfortable with the sex talk,” says Josephine*.

It is also highly convenient; a 2010 American Psychological Association (APA) report estimates 12 percent of all websites are pornography sites, and a quarter of all search-engine requests are for pornography. “Our kids don’t.” What they find, whether accidentally or purposely, isn’t your friend’s older brother’s crumpled Playboy, either.

“These are graphic, moving, [high-definition] images,” says sex educator and therapist Jo Langford.

Like so much of scientific research, it depends on whom you ask, but recent studies suggest viewing porn as an adolescent can have long-term impacts on many aspects of a person’s sexuality, sex life and relationships.

“After 40 years of peer-reviewed research, scholars can say with confidence that porn is an industrial product that shapes how we think about gender, sexuality, relationships, intimacy, sexual violence and gender equality — for the worse,” wrote Gail Dines, professor of sociology at Wheelock College in Boston, for in April.

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